Obesity

Obesity (defined as a body mass index (BMI) >30kg/m2) is a chronic disease that is increasing in prevalence in adults, adolescents, and children and is now considered to be a global epidemic. The National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) in 2016 showed the prevalence of obesity in the United States to be 39.6% (37.9% in men and 41.1% of women), up from 22.9% in 1994.

At Texas Diabetes and Endocrinology we investigate many aspects of this disease. We rule out any possible secondary causes (such as pituitary, thyroid, adrenal or ovarian abnormalities) as clinically indicated, discuss contributing medications, and obtain a thorough weight gain/weight loss history. Obesity is associated with a significant increase in morbidity (including diabetes mellitus, hypertension, dyslipidemia, heart disease, stroke, sleep apnea, and cancer) and we assess these and come up with a comprehensive plan to manage them.

Weight loss itself is associated with a reduction in obesity-associated morbidity and we are committed to helping our patients achieve these benefits. We counsel all patients on lifestyle and behavioral modification. We also offer medically supervised programs to assist with individual goals. Muscle Wise is one program we utilize: it provides structure and one-on-one coaching that can help achieve not only weight loss but also reduction in comorbidities and often medications. We also use FDA-approved weight loss medications as needed to help our patients achieve their goals.

Finally we conduct clinical trials at all of our locations and these often involve obesity treatments. Currently at the south office we are conducting a study on a medication (semaglutide) to evaluate weight loss and long-term cardiovascular outcomes.

Valerie Espinosa, MD Achieves Certification by the American Board of Obesity Medicine

Congratulations to Texas Diabetes & Endocrinology physician partner Valerie Espinosa, MD for achieving certification by the American Board of Obesity Medicine.

The American Board of Obesity Medicine (ABOM) serves the public and the field of obesity medicine by maintaining standards for assessment and credentialing physicians.Certification as an ABOM Diplomate signifies specialized knowledge in the practice of obesity medicine and distinguishes a physician as having achieved competency in obesity care. ABOM collaborates with the National Board of Medical Examiners (NBME) to administer the annual credentialing exam.

Intensive Lifestyle Intervention Improves Metabolism and Bone Strength

Older adults with obesity and type 2 diabetes saw improved glucose control, body composition, physical function, and bone quality when assigned to an intensive diet and exercise program. Preliminary results from an ongoing trial at the Baylor College of Medicine in Houston were just presented at the Endocrine Society Annual Meeting in Boston. Investigators looked at data from 17 adults aged 65 to 85 years. Ten study participants were assigned to follow an intensive diet and exercise based weight loss program, and seven participants continued their daily diet and physical activity routine. At 6 months, there was a significant improvement in average sugar levels (HbA1c), and bone density scores. The study is now looking at specifics to highlight what specific dietary and exercise measures were most beneficial.

Read more here: https://endo.confex.com/endo/2016endo/webprogram/Paper25882.html

Lindsay Harrison, MD authors study published in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism

Texas Diabetes & Endocrinology physician Lindsay Harrison, MD authored a study that was recently published in the JCEM titled Mechanisms of Action of Liraglutide in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Treated with High Dose Insulin.

The study concluded that Treatment with liraglutide significantly improved insulin secretion even in patients with long-standing T2D requiring high-dose insulin treatment. Liraglutide also decreased liver and subcutaneous fat, but did not alter glucagon secretion. – See more at: http://press.endocrine.org/doi/abs/10.1210/jc.2015-3906#sthash.rGdwKIl1.dpuf

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