managing diabetes during the holidays
Diabetes and Holiday Eating: Tips to Stay on Track

The holiday season, and its festive foods, are often the highlight of the year for many people. For those with diabetes though, it can be extra challenging. 

Research from the American Heart Association and American Diabetes Association shows that half of those who have Type 2 diabetes feel that managing it during the holidays is more stressful than any other time of year. 

At Texas Diabetes and Endocrinology, our team of board-certified endocrinologists are dedicated to helping our patients learn best practices for managing their diabetes and gain better control of their health, even during the holidays.

Our diabetes experts recommend planning ahead to help your glucose levels stay at a healthy level during the upcoming holiday season.

How can I manage my diabetes during the holidays? 

1.         Always eat a smart breakfast. Then make a calculated plan to balance your food intake for the rest of the day ahead, and plan accordingly if you will be eating at later times than usual to prevent low sugar episodes.

2.         Get a workout in during the morning and take a walk at night. A workout earlier in the day will help to boost circulation and improve insulin sensitivity, allowing for easier management in the hours to follow. A nighttime walk at the end of the day after a big meal will also help to ease digestion. 

3.         Track your carbohydrate intake. There are many handy and helpful charts and trackers to help you gauge exactly what your carb intake is according to what foods you eat for each holiday, such as ThanksgivingHanukkah, and Christmas (courtesy of the JDRF). Find one that you like and stick to it for the next few months. 

4.         Know what you are eating. Don’t be afraid to ask your relative, host, or restaurant what ingredients (such as sugar, butter and cream) are in the foods you are eating, and how much! This knowledge can help you adjust your portions, or avoid some dishes, accordingly. Or, offer to bring your own low-carb, low-sugar version of something that will be served to share with others. 

5.         Consume alcohol in moderation and watch out for sugary mixers. Festive holiday cocktails are often loaded with sugary mixers such as juices and syrups.  Avoid drinking on an empty stomach as this can also cause your blood sugar to drop, and always drink responsibly.

6.         Test your glucose levels often. Keep as close to your regular testing schedule as possible, and anticipate potential blood sugar spikes and have a plan for when they occur. 

Bring plenty of stabilizing snacks along and your insulin and other medications if traveling. You never know when travel delays may occur, and you’ll want to be prepared. 

All that said, don’t forget to enjoy the holidays and those special festive treats when you can, and know that with a little planning and willpower you are able to get back on track with the next day and the next meal. 

Contact Us Today to Learn More about Managing Your Diabetes

If you’d like to schedule an appointment with Texas Diabetes and Endocrinology and discover how our diabetes treatment services can help you, contact us at (512) 458-8400 or request an appointment online.  

Don’t forget to follow us on Facebook and Instagram and check back with us each month as we provide you helpful wellness and health information.

diabetes myths
Diabetes Myths: Seperating Fact from Fiction

With diabetes on a steady incline globally, knowing the facts is essential. Here are five common diabetes myths and how to take charge of your health.

Eating too much sugar causes diabetes

Although this myth is false, there are some complexities surrounding the matter. Eating too much sugar doesn’t cause diabetes directly. However, a diet consisting mainly of sugar can lead to excess weight and obesity, which are risk factors for type 2 diabetes. 

Prediabetes will always lead to diabetes

Prediabetes occurs in about one out of every three adults in the United States and means that your blood glucose levels are higher than normal, but not high enough to be considered diabetes yet.

Prediabetes can put you at risk of type 2 diabetes, stroke, and heart disease. Luckily, proper diet changes and staying active can help prevent that from happening.

Being overweight causes diabetes

This is false. While being overweight puts you at risk of developing diabetes, it doesn’t always lead to the condition. Other diabetes risk factors include family history, age, race, lack of physical activity, and being diagnosed as prediabetic or previously having gestational diabetes. 

It’s not safe to exercise when you have diabetes

Regular exercise plays a key role in regulating blood sugar levels and therefore managing diabetes. Physical activity also helps lower your risk of diabetes-related complications, such as heart disease and nerve damage. The American Diabetes Association recommends 150 minutes of moderate intensity aerobic exercise per week. 

Our endocrinologists advise patients to keep the following recommendations in mind:

  • Always talk to your doctor before starting a new workout regime.
  • Prevent dehydration by drinking plenty of fluids.
  • Always check your blood sugar before and after being physically active, especially if you take insulin. You may need to adjust your dosage based on how your body reacts to exercise. 

I’ll know if I have diabetes

In a recent 2020 CDC report, 7.2 million adults who met laboratory criteria for diabetes were not aware of or did not report having diabetes.

Some diabetes symptoms can be hard to spot, take years to develop, or only appear when blood sugar levels are extremely high. Symptoms such as consistent hunger, thirst, blurred vision, and frequent urination should not be ignored. Routine wellness exams are critical in detecting diabetes early and preventing any long-term complications.

Endocrinologists in Austin, TX

If you’d like to learn more about our full range of endocrine services, please call Texas Diabetes and Endocrinology at (512) 458-8400 or request an appointment online

Don’t forget to follow us on Facebook and Instagram and check back with us each month as we provide you helpful wellness and health information.

Dr. Srujana Yada Clarifies How Ultra-Processed Foods Affect People with Type 2 Diabetes 

Ultra-processed foods are natural foods that have been changed by adding ingredients like salt, sugar, oil, and other additives. These changes result in longer shelf life and convenience. They make up about 60% of the average individual’s caloric intake. 

Research has indicated that eating ultra-processed foods can increase mortality risk in people with type 2 diabetes. The risk of heart disease is more than double with UPA’s.

In a recent Healthline article, endocrinologist Dr. Srujana Yada shares her knowledge about ultra-processed food’s effect on the body. Dr. Yada says “UPFs are loaded with sugar and have less fiber, which leads to rapid glucose spikes and can cause weight gain, increased insulin resistance, and worsened diabetes control.”

Read the article to learn about ultra-processed foods’ effect on people with type 2 diabetes.

For more information on our personalized approach to diabetes management, schedule a consultation with one of our board certified endocrinologists by requesting an appointment online or call (512) 458-8400. 

Don’t forget to follow us on Facebook and Instagram and check back with us each month as we provide you with helpful wellness and health information.

Advanced Practice Providers (APPs) are skilled professionals that play a critical role in our practice to ensure patients receive high quality, comprehensive care.
What is an Advanced Practice Provider?

Advanced Practice Providers (APPs) are skilled professionals that play a critical role in our practice to ensure patients receive high quality, comprehensive care. Our endocrinologists work with Physician Assistants (PA), Nurse Practitioners (NP), and Clinical Nurse Specialists (CNS), who all have extensive training and offer a patient-centered approach that focuses on preventive care, education and overall wellness.

What is the difference between the various types of APPs? 

Physician Assistant has a master’s degree and works in collaboration with a licensed physician, providing almost all services as a physician. A Nurse Practitioner has earned both a bachelor of science in nursing and a master of science in nursing degree prior to undergoing a certification exam and applying for a NP license. A Clinical Nurse Specialist is a graduate-level registered nurse who is certified in a specialty. Nurse Practitioners and Clinical Nurse Specialists can both diagnose and treat patients, prescribe medications, and order and interpret medical tests.

What is a Certified Diabetes Educator? 

At Texas Diabetes, all of our advanced practice providers are also Certified Diabetes Educators (CDE), who educate, support, and advocate for people impacted by diabetes. CDEs must have clinical diabetes experience and training and pass a national exam to become credentialed. Our APPs have comprehensive knowledge and experience in diabetes prevention, prediabetes and diabetes management. 

APPs at Texas Diabetes and Endocrinology

The APPs at Texas Diabetes and Endocrinology have had rigorous clinical training, are licensed by the State of Texas, and can prescribe medication. Most of our new diabetes patients will have their initial visit with an APP who will spend time with you getting a thorough health history, reviewing lab results, and devising an appropriate treatment plan. Our number one goal is to educate and support you on your journey and be there every step of the way to help you manage your condition.  

We are fortunate to have the opportunity to work with such an incredible team of APPs, including:

  • Amanda Bonazzi, MSN, APRN, ACNS-BC, CDCES
  • Ashley Davila, MSN, ACNS-BC, Clinical Lipid Specialist
  • Azaret Villeda, MSN, APRN, FNP-C
  • Ben Pagano, MSN, ACNS-BC, CDE
  • Brandy Wellmon, PA-C, CDCES
  • Carmen Addington, MSN, FNP, CDCES
  • Carrie Barlow, PA-C, CDCES,
  • Emily Simon, MSN, APRN, AGCNS-BC, CDCES
  • Jessica Ribeiro, RN, MSN, FNP, CDCES
  • Kim Jones, MSN, FNP, CDCES
  • Rachel Kohls, MSN, AGCNS-BC, CDCES
  • Sarah King, MSN, FNP-C, CDCES
  • Tracy Chan, MSN, FNP, CDCES

If you’d like to learn more about our full range of endocrine services, please call Texas Diabetes and Endocrinology at (512) 458-8400 or request an appointment online.  

Don’t forget to follow us on Facebook and Instagram and check back with us each month as we provide you helpful wellness and health information.

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